Eyegiene

"Villa Rides" and yet another exercise in the history Mexican stereotypes in U.S. mass culture


An epic moment in the history of Mexican stereotypes fabrication--the type of film that puts the "bad" in "bad hombres." VILLA RIDES is an underwhelming western from Paramount featuring bald poster child Yul Brynner as Pancho Villa. 

The reviews off of wikipedia are restrained AND on point:

Film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert, gave the film a mixed review, writing, "You would think an interesting picture could be made about Pancho Villa and the Mexican Revolution, a subject most Americans know next to nothing about. But we learn nothing except that Pancho was a romantic fellow who had a mustache and liked to have people lined up three in a row and killed with one bullet. (That scene, incidentally, got a big laugh.) Frankly, this kind of movie is beginning to get to me. You can enjoy one, maybe, or two. Or you can enjoy a particularly well done shoot-em-up. But the Loop has been filled with one action-adventure after another for the last month, and if Villa Rides is not the worst, it is certainly not the best."

Film critic A. H. Weiler wrote, "Yul Brynner, Robert Mitchum, cavalry, politicos and even the faint strains of "La Cucaracha" fail to disguise the fact that Villa Rides which dashed into the Forum Theater yesterday, is simply a sprawling Western and not history. As such it incessantly fills the screen with the din of pistols and rifles, and assorted warfare and wenching, shot in sharp color on rugged Spanish sites that strikingly simulate Mexico. Any resemblance to the 1912-1914 campaigns of the bandit-revolutionary in the cause of liberal President Madero and against General Huerta is purely coincidental."[4]

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villa_Rides

What do you get?  A glorious poster made up of lobby card facsmiles printed as a 11x17 poster on glossy, archival stock paper signed and numbered by the artist.
11.95 USD 7.95 USD